LincolnshireSCAMBLESBYStMartin(explorechurches.org)

Inspire me

Whatever your passion; art, wildlife, sculpture, family history, architecture, walking, rock climbing, searching out the most perfect cream tea or even just finding somewhere quiet to sit and read a book. These are all things you can do in church buildings around the UK. Here you will find themes to inspire and trails to follow.

11 churches

LancashireALTCARStMichaelAllAngels(church)2

Wooden churches

Most ancient churches started off as simple wooden structures, but were soon adapted. Now, wooden churches are, therefore, rare in the UK, whether they have survived for centuries or are relatively new.

11 churches

GreaterLondonTOWEROFLONDONStPeterVincula(cardenandgodfrey)1

London’s unseen chapels

London is teeming with chapels of all shapes and sizes, often out of view of the main tourist routes and, sadly, many people miss them. Here are some often unseen gems to explore.

11 churches

SirChristopherWren

Sir Christopher Wren

Sir Christopher Wren (1632-1723) was one of the most highly acclaimed English architects in history. He rebuilt 52 churches in the City of London after the Great Fire in 1666, including what is regarded as his masterpiece, St Paul's Cathedral, completed in 1710, and where he is buried.

8 churches

Tyne&WearJARROWStPaul(stringingbedes)1

Oldest churches

The building of churches, whether for monasteries or public use, was an early sign of the growing influence of Christianity. What is astounding is how many elements of these earliest buildings survive today. This list includes churches where ancient fabric dates from pre AD800, and all are still being used.

11 churches

CapabilityBrownCosway(cb300)1

Capability Brown

Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown was probably England’s greatest landscape designer. He changed the face of 18th century England, designing country estates and mansions, moving hills and making flowing lakes and serpentine rivers, a magical world of green. He even had a hand in a few churches.

12 churches

ConwyGWYTHERINStWinifred(conservationfoundation)1

Ancient yew trees

As ancient as they are beautiful, our churches are the present custodians of yew trees planted and cared for over many centuries. From 500 year old trees planted in the Middle Ages, 800 year old trees planted by the Normans, even older specimens planted by Saxons and early Welsh saints and the possibility that some might even predate Christianity.

Supported by National Churches Trust, for people who love church buildings