St Peter in the Wood

Haven of peace in a quiet Hampshire village; open daily.

About this church

Head north through Appleshaw and you will see St Peter in the Wood on your right. It is set back from the road and surrounded by brick and flint boundary walls on all sides. A small iron gate marks the entrance to the churchyard, with a path leading to the west door within the tower. Sit on the bench in front of the church or have a wander through the graveyard.

In early spring you might come across the daffodils that the Reverend George Engleheart (1851-1936) devoted his life to breeding. Walk into the church building and enjoy the calm simplicity of the interior. Several items are worth inspecting. There is a Royal Coat of Arms of William IV dated 1831. The Victorian octagonal font, which originally came from the parish church of Andover, is on your right as you walk in.

Perhaps the most interesting item cannot be seen: up in the tower is a Sanctus bell from the 12th or 13th century, making it one of the oldest in Winchester Diocese; and no one knows how it got there.

Have a look at the design for a tapestry with scenes relating to the local area (the original tapestry is in the Council Offices in Andover). There are also some wall monuments of 1785, 1798, 1807 and 1835 including the Lord’s Prayer. Admire the Ascension of Christ above the altar, a stained glass window made in memory of Ellen Maria Stock (1858-1949). Here is an extract from the 1960 listed building description: The building was rebuilt on an old site in 1830 in a Gothic style, with a rendered and painted tower at the west end.

The plan of the building follows a cruciform arrangement, with the nave and the chancel being of similar length. The north transept remains in use for seating, while the south transept has been separated from the rest of the church by a timber and glass screen. This conceals the vestry. The history of the church predates the current building; there was a place of worship here since the middle ages.

There is evidence of Romans living in the area; Revd Engleheart sold five Roman platters to the British Museum in 1897, which form part of the 'Appleshaw hoard' of 32 Roman pewter vessels now owned by the British Museum.

Key Features

  • Enchanting atmosphere
  • Fascinating churchyard

Visitors information

  • Ramp or level access available on request
  • On street parking at church
  • Dog friendly
  • Walkers & cyclists welcome
  • Space to secure your bike

Other nearby churches

St Peter & St Paul

Thruxton church has been at the heart of village life for over 850 years, many of the church’s treasures are in the form of tombs and effigies of some of the Lords and Ladies of the Manor.

St Michael & All Angels

A gorgeous 12th century pilgrim church en route to Southampton and a quiet place on edge of modern Andover, the church has links to Jane Austen and Archbishop Alphege, as well as Ethelred the Unready.

St James

The Grade I church is built in a mixture of styles from Norman to the 17th century.

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