St Peter

An attractive, thriving, late Victorian church, with a modern attached church centre.

About this church

Designed by Mr Shrewsbury, a renowned local architect, the eastern end of St Peter’s, described as 'early pointed style architecture, predominantly made of red brick with bath stone and grey brick dressings', was consecrated on 14th of April 1898. By October 1908 the western half of the nave had been completed.

The west and clerestory windows are from William Morris's factory, the west window having a typical Art Nouveau lily pattern, while the aisle windows are on the theme 'Notable Christians of the Church of England'. A window depicting scenes from the life of St Peter is situated in the north wall of the chancel. The unusual east window is based on the Benedicite 'O all ye works of the Lord, bless ye the Lord', each window depicting a season of the year.

In 1963 the central bell turret was removed and a tower was built above the existing transept. This work was followed by changes in the layout of the church grounds. An old reading room was removed from the south side of the church and a new entrance was made in the newly resurfaced St Peters Road. In 2001 the interior of the church was reordered to create an attractive multi function space more suited to modern worship requirements. 

While extensions had been added at the eastern end of the church in the 1930s, 1970s and 1980s, by the early 21st century these were no longer fit for purpose, so were replaced in 2013 by a new church centre extension. Linked to the main church and designed to architecturally complement it, this consists of two semi circular forms fronting St Peter’s Road wrapped around by a band of windows beneath conical tiled roofs. Within this centre on two floors are a range of meeting rooms, a large kitchen and accessible toilets. A mezzanine floor was also installed within the tower at this time, while hedges, gates and overgrown trees were removed from the grounds, to make the church more open and to improve its visibility and presence in the streetscape.

Key Features

  • Enchanting atmosphere

Visitors information

  • Level access to the main areas
  • Car park at church
  • On street parking at church
  • Accessible toilets in church
  • Café within 500m
  • Dog friendly
  • Walkers & cyclists welcome
  • Space to secure your bike
  • Wifi

Other nearby churches

JohnSalmon
BerkshireBOYNEHILLAllSaints(johnsalmonCC-BY-SA2.0)1

All Saints

A perfect example of a neo Gothic Victorian church and its parochial buildings designed by George Edmund Street in a unique collegiate style surrounding a peaceful enclosed quadrangle.

St Nicolas

A Victorian mock medieval village church with 1,400 years of history telling the tale of medieval baptisms and buried Saxon treasure.

Help support ExploreChurches by becoming a Friend of the National Churches Trust