St Martin within Ludgate

One of the most striking aspects about St Martin within Ludgate exterior is its tall, sharp leaded spire, which when seen from the lower part of Fleet Street, is a deliberate foil to the massive rounded dome of St Paul's Cathedral.

About this church

No doubt Wren planned this dramatic effect when he reconstructed the previous medieval church, destroyed by the Great Fire, between 1677 and 1684.

Notable woodwork includes the original reredos, communion table, communion rails and pulpit. There are also bread shelves, on which wealthier worshippers would place bread for the poor of the parish to collect.

The simplicity of the interior with its vibrant stained-glass windows and impressive organ comes to life when the large central brass chandelier is lit with real candles. This signature piece was brought from St Vincent Cathedral in the West Indies in 1777.

The font under the organ gallery is inscribed with a Greek palindrome: NIYON ANOMHMA MH MONAN OYIN ('cleanse my sin not only my face').

The building sustained the least damage of all City churches during World War II.

There is a 360 tour of the church

Key Features

  • Captivating architecture
  • Glorious furnishings
  • Social heritage stories
  • National heritage here

Visitors information

  • Bus stop within 100m
  • Steps to enter the church or churchyard
  • Accessible toilets in church
  • Non-accessible toilets in church
  • Café within 500m

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St Benet Paul’s Wharf

There has been a church on this site, dedicated to St Benet (or Benedict), since the 12th century, Shakespeare refers to it and both Anne Boleyn and Lady Jane Grey may have received the last rites here.

Supported by National Churches Trust, for people who love church buildings