St Augustine

St Augustine’s promises a warm welcome to all visitors, whether they are looking in on their parish church or have a special interest in stained glass.

About this church

Look around at the beauties of this historic building. It proclaims the confidence and generosity of Sheffield church people at the end of the 19th and early 20th century. The parish of St Augustine’s was created in 1896 to meet the needs of the new estates springing up around the Ecclesall Road. The £10,000 needed to build the church was raised in under two years, and the church opened in 1898.

The magnificent east window by Charles Kempe is a memorial to the key fund raiser for the building, Archdeacon William Favell. Further Kempe windows on the north and south aisles were installed, several as memorials to parishioners who died in the First World War. They depict a range of English saints. The church houses the memorial to the crew of an American bomber which crashed in 1944 in nearby Endcliffe Park, killing all the crew. There are also three murals showing the life of St Augustine of Canterbury (to whom the church is dedicated) and a mosaic of the other St Augustine of Hippo.

In 1973 three bays at the west end of the church were cut off to make the church hall, which now provides meeting space for several local societies.

Key Features

  • Captivating architecture
  • Spectacular stained glass
  • Magnificent memorials
  • Glorious furnishings
  • Social heritage stories
  • National heritage here

Visitors information

  • Bus stop within 100m
  • Level access to the main areas
  • Car park at church
  • Accessible toilets in church
  • Space to secure your bike

Other nearby churches

Trinity URC

The church building, designed by John Mark Mansell Jenkinson, the second generation of a Sheffield firm of architects, was opened in 1971.

St Mark

More information about this church coming soon.

St William of York

This lovely Catholic Church is light and airy and a wonderful contrast to the busy city.

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