All Saints

All Saints has been a focus of Hereford life for over 800 years, its dramatic twisted spire dominates the skyline, and the medieval interior is an inspired meeting of the sacred and the secular.

About this church

The original All Saints, probably dating from 1200AD, did not last long and it may well have been damaged by an earthquake. Rebuilding was soon started, but took a long time and it was not until about 1330 that the new church was completed, very much as we see it today.

It seems that the tower and spire had always leant over (until the straightening of the 1990s), because the builders did not realise until it was too late that they were laying their foundations of one side very close to one and possibly more rubbish puts. In later years the spire was given a further twist at the top, as metal fixing for the stones rusted badly and pushed the stones out of place. There is a ring of eight bells, which regularly peel out over the city.

A massive project of repairs and restoration took place in the 1990s. All Saints re-opened in July 1997 and since then has gone from strength to strength with an average of over three thousand visitors a week. The building is a church, a community centre and a cafe. It is a place where people of all faiths and beliefs are welcome to pray, worship, talk, eat a delicious meal or use the space for all kinds of performances and meetings.

Key Features

  • Captivating architecture
  • Spectacular stained glass
  • Magnificent memorials
  • Glorious furnishings
  • Social heritage stories

Visitors information

  • Bus stop within 100m
  • Level access to the main areas
  • On street parking at church
  • Parking within 250m
  • Accessible toilets nearby
  • Café within 500m
  • Dog friendly
  • Walkers & cyclists welcome
  • Space to secure your bike

Other nearby churches

Hereford Cathedral

There has been a place of worship on the cathedral site since at least the 8th century, although no part of any building earlier than the 11th century bishop’s chapel survives. The medieval cathedral was not monastic; the governing body, known as the Dean and Chapter, were not monks but secular priests who led active lives in the world. They employed the Vicars Choral, a body of clergy who lived a collegiate life in the Vicars’ Cloister, to sing the daily services for them.

Eignbrook URC

Our visitors describe this as a beautiful church, it is on the outskirts of the city centre, outside the old city walls, a peaceful, genuinely restful building.

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